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Moving to London

Thousands of gay men move to London every year to build a life, to be better connected with who they are, feel a sense a belonging, and maybe to find a man (or several).

Gay men also move to London to escape intolerance, homophobia, and violence. Most of us have heard at least one heartbreaking coming out story, and who hasn't been asked "Have you come out... what was it like... does your family know?"

What new arrivals often don't realise is that London is one of the high maintenance capitals of the world. Living there is tough, and being happy tougher still. It can be very lonely, and even lonelier than the past you came from. Many of us are happy in London, some of us do OK, but some of us struggle.

So, whether you've travelled from a field in Norfolk, a village halfway around the world, or from a family who do not accept you for who you are, the quality of the friendships you make will be a key to your happiness and well-being. And that's a promise.

Nine reasons why London is the best place on earth to be gay | Time Out | 14 Jun 2016
The 'gaytrification' effect: why gay neighbourhoods are being priced out | The Guardian | 13 Jun 2016
17 things you'll learn when you move to London | Gay Star News | 16 Oct 2015
Are people in London more likely to be gay? | Pink News | 1 Oct 2015

The Story of Two Gay Men in Different Lifestyle | Documentary | 18 Apr 2014 | 7m 51s
London in 1927 & 2013 | Simon Smith | 30 Dec 2013 | 6m 1s
Oldest Footage of London Ever | Yestervid | 16 Apr 2015 | 11m 2s
Jason Hawkes: London Aerial Footage | Jack Cook 7 Jan 2015 | 5m 13s
Jason Hawkes: London from the Air | Den of Lambs | 9 Sep 2012 | 4m 2s

Queer Tours of London

Queers Tours of London shines a light on London’s rich LGBTQI history through creative and life-affirming interactive tours. The tours tell the stories of London’s queer history, shedding light on the lives, spaces, identities, repression and resistance that form the backdrop of LGBTQI lives today.

Queers Tours of London do this through educational, accessible and interactive walking tours, cabarets, street-art and events that bring life to the complexities and lived experiences of our history, present and vision for the future – watch this space for the calendar of events.

Queer Tours of London

LGBT+ London or should it be LGBTQIAABAACG

Greater London is 1,572 square kilometres (607 sq miles) and you will live in one of 33 boroughs that make up the Capital, packed with 8½ million people from all backgrounds, cultures, creeds and colours. Running beneath your feet are 402 kilometres (249 miles) of Underground carrying 1.265 billion passengers a year. It's expensive, noisy, and it will take you an hour plus to cross the City, north to south, east to west.

The debate as to whether a single gay community exists is an old one, and London is no different. One is more inclined to say it is a diverse range of smaller communities with local geographies within the Capital. In the past, London's wider LGBT community has come together in times of need: gay liberation in the 60s/ 70s, march against Clause 28, and created from scratch a network of life-giving community AIDS/HIV services in the 80s and 90s. Annual Pride marches in London stretch back to 1972, and while Soho has the largest concentration of gay venues in London there are many smaller scenes and communities threaded across the City.

 London Underground: 150 fascinating Tube facts | Telegraph | 6 Jul 2015
London Underground | Wikipedia
London | Wikipedia
London's top 10 towers | The Guardian | 5 May 2014


Soho Goes Gay: Greek Street, Soho (1955) | British Pathé | 13 Apr 2014 | 2m 8s

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